FIRST VISIT

YOUR FIRST VISIT

We want your experience with Little White Tooth to be a wonderful one, starting with your child’s first visit. That’s why we have only a few little things you need to do, and we just happen to have them listed below. It’s real easy – let’s get started!

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THINGS TO MAKE YOU SMILE ON YOUR FIRST VISIT

As a mom and veteran-owned specialty pediatric dental office, we understand getting ready for your child’s first pediatric dental visit can be just as important as the actual visit. Here are are some helpful tips to guide you and your smile on your way.

Talk to your children about going to the dentist. Let them know there will be laughing, toys, games and that we are going to make his or her teeth sparkle like a superhero or princess.

Use positive words to describe the upcoming visit. A relaxed, comfortable child will be able to associate those positive words with his or her trip to our office and really make for a smooth visit.

Try to arrive to the appointment about 10-15 minutes early. This gives our team a chance to review information with you prior to the appointment.

Talk to your children about going to the dentist. Let them know there will be laughing, toys, games and that we are going to make his or her teeth sparkle like a superhero or princess.

Use positive words to describe the upcoming visit. A relaxed, comfortable child will be able to associate those positive words with his or her trip to our office and really make for a smooth visit.

Prepare your little one(s) by role-playing with them about what our team will be doing. Get them comfortable opening his or her mouth and touching their teeth.

Try to arrive to the appointment about 10-15 minutes early. This gives our team a chance to review information with you prior to the appointment.

If you have dental anxiety or have had prior experiences which were less than ideal – try not to show or talk about your uneasiness with your children. They can pick up it and establish his or her own set of expectations based on your behavior.

Don’t try to bribe your little one(s) to go to the dentist. This may give them the idea that going to the dentist is less than desirable.

Talk to your children about going to the dentist. Let them know there will be laughing, toys, games and that we are going to make his or her teeth sparkle like a superhero or princess.

Use positive words to describe the upcoming visit. A relaxed, comfortable child will be able to associate those positive words with his or her trip to our office and really make for a smooth visit.

Try to arrive to the appointment about 10-15 minutes early. This gives our team a chance to review information with you prior to the appointment.

Prepare your little one(s) by role-playing with them about what our team will be doing. Get them comfortable opening his or her mouth and touching their teeth.

If you have dental anxiety or have had prior experiences which were less than ideal – try not to show or talk about your uneasiness with your children. They can pick up it and establish his or her own set of expectations based on your behavior.

Don’t try to bribe your little one(s) to go to the dentist. This may give them the idea that going to the dentist is less than desirable.

Prepare your little one(s) by role-playing with them about what our team will be doing. Get them comfortable opening his or her mouth and touching their teeth.

If you have dental anxiety or have had prior experiences which were less than ideal – try not to show or talk about your uneasiness with your children. They can pick up it and establish his or her own set of expectations based on your behavior.

Don’t try to bribe your little one(s) to go to the dentist. This may give them the idea that going to the dentist is less than desirable.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION TO KNOW

Your child will receive a thorough examination with mom and veteran, Dr. Veneberg, where she’ll discuss results with our smile report card, offer recommendations for how to best care for your child’s teeth, and much more. Oral health education, tooth eruption, brushing techniques, flossing, healthy snacks and fluoride recommendations are just some of the topics discussed during your child’s initial cleaning and exam appointment. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends a child visit the dentist for an initial oral evaluation within 6 months of the eruption of his/her first baby tooth and no later than their first birthday. It is important to start children early in the right direction to good dental hygiene and building healthy, life-long habits